Mara Sánchez-Renero

Eutopía lúcida: Carrousel

2017
Ed. 5 + 2 A.P.
Archival pigment print

180 x 120 cm

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The Big Unknown, a quest for Nature. In Mexico, as in the rest of the world, thousands are leaving the countryside each year moving to the metropolis. Nature slowly verges into the blind spots outlying on the rim of our consciousness. ‘What is nature, and what is it to us?’ Are the questions that The Big Unknown poses. Nature shifts from being a real immediate surrounding to a fictive –sometimes ideal– place scarily visited which leaves us as strangers. And yet, Nature in its archaic form keeps appearing to us –sometimes forcefully, sometimes as nothing more than light and shadow– displayed in the city space. Roland Barthes talks about the ‘punctum’ in his studies on photography. When we look at the elements around us, a visual spot catches our eyes creating a delicate ‘hors champ’. With the ‘punctum’, Barthes refers to the terminology of Optical Science, where Accommodation is defined by the distance between the nearest (punctum proximum) and the farthest (punctum remotum) clear visual point. In the Big Unknown –ALMANAQUE’s fourth exhibition– two artists: Mara Sánchez-Renero (Mexico), and Danila Tkachenko (Russia) take us into an antipodal ride, showing their personal ‘punctum’. An exquisitely unique, man-made vision of landscapes, ‘nature’ and mere space.

Please provide name and email for information


5.00 m 3.00 m

Approximate view with unframed print. Ask for exact available dimensions

x

Mara Sánchez-Renero

Eutopía lúcida: Dragón

2017
Ed. 5 + 2 A.P.
Archival pigment print

180 x 120 cm

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The Big Unknown, a quest for Nature. In Mexico, as in the rest of the world, thousands are leaving the countryside each year moving to the metropolis. Nature slowly verges into the blind spots outlying on the rim of our consciousness. ‘What is nature, and what is it to us?’ Are the questions that The Big Unknown poses. Nature shifts from being a real immediate surrounding to a fictive –sometimes ideal– place scarily visited which leaves us as strangers. And yet, Nature in its archaic form keeps appearing to us –sometimes forcefully, sometimes as nothing more than light and shadow– displayed in the city space. Roland Barthes talks about the ‘punctum’ in his studies on photography. When we look at the elements around us, a visual spot catches our eyes creating a delicate ‘hors champ’. With the ‘punctum’, Barthes refers to the terminology of Optical Science, where Accommodation is defined by the distance between the nearest (punctum proximum) and the farthest (punctum remotum) clear visual point. In the Big Unknown –ALMANAQUE’s fourth exhibition– two artists: Mara Sánchez-Renero (Mexico), and Danila Tkachenko (Russia) take us into an antipodal ride, showing their personal ‘punctum’. An exquisitely unique, man-made vision of landscapes, ‘nature’ and mere space.

Please provide name and email for information


5.00 m 3.00 m

Approximate view with unframed print. Ask for exact available dimensions

x

Danila Tkachenko

Lost Horizon: Central Computing Center

2016
Ed. 7 + 2 A.P.
Archival pigment print

80 x 80 cm

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2016. The world promised by the October Revolution had to be not only fair and prosperous, but to also colonise the outer space. Socialism should have been established not only in space, but also in time, aided by technology which would allow to turn time into eternity. But over time, the economical failures had also brought disillusionment about the political utopia and about the promised bright future. In Lost Horizon, Tkachenko shot objects, which represent the image of the ideal cosmic future. He chose the format 6×6, encapsulating the utopian state projects into the Suprematist form of his fellow compatriot artist founder of the Russian Avant-Garde Kasimir Malevich’s ‘The Black Square’ from 1917, which being a revolutionary art piece, reflects the historical epoch it was conceived in.

Please provide name and email for information


5.00 m 3.00 m

Approximate view with unframed print. Ask for exact available dimensions

x

Danila Tkachenko

Lost Horizon: “Friendship” Pension, Crimea

2016
Ed. 6 + 2 A.P.
Archival pigment print

120 x 120 cm

80 x 80 cm
Ed. 7 + 2 A.P.
Archival pigment print

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View in Room
inquire

Lost Horizon (2016). The world promised by the October Revolution had to be not only fair and prosperous, but to also colonise the outer space. Socialism should have been established not only in space, but also in time, aided by technology which would allow to turn time into eternity. But over time, the economical failures had also brought disillusionment about the political utopia and about the promised bright future. In Lost Horizon, Tkachenko shot objects, which represent the image of the ideal cosmic future. He chose the format 6×6, encapsulating the utopian state projects into the Suprematist form of his fellow compatriot artist founder of the Russian Avant-Gard Kasimir Malevich’s ‘The Black Square’ from 1917, which being a revolutionary art piece, reflects the historical epoch it was conceived in.

Please provide name and email for information


5.00 m 3.00 m

Approximate view with unframed print. Ask for exact available dimensions

x

Danila Tkachenko

Lost Horizon: Model of the rocket which carried the first cosmonaut

2016
Ed. 7 + 2 A.P.
Archival pigment print

80 x 80 cm

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Lost Horizon (2016). The world promised by the October Revolution had to be not only fair and prosperous, but to also colonise the outer space. Socialism should have been established not only in space, but also in time, aided by technology which would allow to turn time into eternity. But over time, the economical failures had also brought disillusionment about the political utopia and about the promised bright future. In Lost Horizon, Tkachenko shot objects, which represent the image of the ideal cosmic future. He chose the format 6×6, encapsulating the utopian state projects into the Suprematist form of his fellow compatriot artist founder of the Russian Avant-Gard Kasimir Malevich’s ‘The Black Square’ from 1917, which being a revolutionary art piece, reflects the historical epoch it was conceived in.

Please provide name and email for information


5.00 m 3.00 m

Approximate view with unframed print. Ask for exact available dimensions

x

Danila Tkachenko

Lost Horizon: Marx generator for high-energy physics experiments

2016
Ed. 7 + 2 A.P.
Archival pigment print

80 x 80 cm

More
View in Room
inquire

Lost Horizon (2016). The world promised by the October Revolution had to be not only fair and prosperous, but to also colonise the outer space. Socialism should have been established not only in space, but also in time, aided by technology which would allow to turn time into eternity. But over time, the economical failures had also brought disillusionment about the political utopia and about the promised bright future. In Lost Horizon, Tkachenko shot objects, which represent the image of the ideal cosmic future. He chose the format 6×6, encapsulating the utopian state projects into the Suprematist form of his fellow compatriot artist founder of the Russian Avant-Gard Kasimir Malevich’s ‘The Black Square’ from 1917, which being a revolutionary art piece, reflects the historical epoch it was conceived in.

Please provide name and email for information


5.00 m 3.00 m

Approximate view with unframed print. Ask for exact available dimensions

x

The Big Unknown, a quest for Nature.

 

In Mexico, as in the rest of the world, thousands are leaving the countryside each year moving to the metropolis. Nature slowly verges into the blind spots outlying on the rim of our consciousness. ‘What is nature, and what is it to us?’ Are the questions that The Big Unknown poses. Nature shifts from being a real immediate surrounding to a fictive –sometimes ideal– place scarily visited which leaves us as strangers.

And yet, Nature in its archaic form keeps appearing to us –sometimes forcefully, sometimes as nothing more than light and shadow– displayed in the city space. Roland Barthes talks about the ‘punctum’ in his studies on photography. When we look at the elements around us, a visual spot catches our eyes creating a delicate ‘hors champ’. With the ‘punctum’, Barthes refers to the terminology of  Optical Science, where Accommodation is defined by the distance between the nearest (punctum proximum) and

the farthest (punctum remotum) clear visual point. In the Big Unknown –ALMANAQUE’s fourth exhibition– two artists: Mara Sánchez-Renero (Mexico), and Danila Tkachenko (Russia) take us into an antipodal ride, showing their personal ‘punctum’.  An exquisitely unique, man-made vision of landscapes, ‘nature’ and mere space.

 

Corinna Koch, curator. Mexico City, 2017.