Danila Tkachenko

Rusia, 1989.
Vive y trabaja en Moscú.

Danila Tkachenko

Fragments №8. Peter Paul Rubens, The Rape of the Daughters of Leucippus.

2023

Archival Pigment Print

Ed. 4 + 1 A.P.
200 x 150 cm

Ed. 9 + 1 A.P.

120 x 90 cm

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5.00 m 3.00 m

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Danila Tkachenko

Fragments №12. Nicolas Poussin, The Companions of Rinaldo.

2023

Archival Pigment Print

Ed. 4 + 1 A.P.
200 x 150 cm

Ed. 9 + 1 A.P.

120 x 90 cm

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Danila Tkachenko

Fragments №5. Caravaggio, The Beheading of St John the Baptist.

2023

Archival Pigment Print

Ed. 4 + 1 A.P.
200 x 150 cm

Ed. 9 + 1 A.P.

120 x 90 cm

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Danila Tkachenko

Fragments №11. Leonardo da Vinci, Salvator Mundi.

2023

Archival Pigment Print

Ed. 4 + 1 A.P.
200 x 150 cm

Ed. 9 + 1 A.P.

120 x 90 cm

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Danila Tkachenko

Fragments №9. Johannes Vermeer, Girl with a Pearl Earring.

2023

Archival Pigment Print

Ed. 4 + 1 A.P.
200 x 150 cm

Ed. 9 + 1 A.P.

120 x 90 cm

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Danila Tkachenko

Fragments №2. Leonardo da Vinci, The Last Suppert.

2023

Archival Pigment Print

Ed. 4 + 1 A.P.
200 x 150 cm

Ed. 9 + 1 A.P.

120 x 90 cm

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Danila Tkachenko

Fragments №4. Andrea Mantegna, Lamentation of Christ.

2023

Archival Pigment Print

Ed. 4 + 1 A.P.
200 x 150 cm

Ed. 9 + 1 A.P.

120 x 90 cm

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Danila Tkachenko

Fragments №7. Andrei Rublev, Trinity.

2023

Archival Pigment Print

Ed. 4 + 1 A.P.
200 x 150 cm

Ed. 9 + 1 A.P.

120 x 90 cm

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Danila Tkachenko

Fragments №6. Leonardo da Vinci, Madonna Litta.

2023

Archival Pigment Print

Ed. 4 + 1 A.P.
200 x 150 cm

Ed. 9 + 1 A.P.

120 x 90 cm

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Danila Tkachenko

Fragments №3. Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Les Grandes Baigneuses.

2023

Archival Pigment Print

Ed. 4 + 1 A.P.
200 x 150 cm

Ed. 9 + 1 A.P.

120 x 90 cm

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Danila Tkachenko

Oasis: 6

Archival Pigment Print
2018

Available in 2 sizes: Ed. 4: 200 x 150 cm & Ed. 9:

130 x 100 cm

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(size plus photo frame) This project was commissioned by Qatar Museums as part of Qatar-Russia 2018 year of culture photographic exchange.

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5.00 m 3.00 m

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Danila Tkachenko

Oasis: 5

Archival Pigment Print
2018

Available in 2 sizes: Ed. 9: 130x100cm & Ed. 4:

200 x 150 cm

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(size plus photo frame) This project was commissioned by Qatar Museums as part of Qatar-Russia 2018 year of culture photographic exchange.

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5.00 m 3.00 m

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Danila Tkachenko

Oasis: 4

Oasis: 4

Archival Pigment Print
2018

200 x 150 cm

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The Middle East concentrates our ancient human history… Qatar was populated in the third millennium B.C. and since then, despite the desert environment, its population has farmed, harvested, fished and built. Like other areas of the world, over the past thirty years, Qatar has enjoyed some of the fastest economic development rates from the entire history. A small handful of new billionaires flourish on the sand dunes while poverty remains as a challenge in the whole world. The appearance of Middle East cities has been transformed rapidly, yet the rest is exactly the same as thousands of years ago. Infrastructure improved as education did with new modern roads and vast crystal skyscrapers with imposible architecture appearing on the horizon like a mirage. It seems that this conspicuous new capitalism heave does not imply much physical labour for the contemporary Qataris, since workers were invited from abroad. Perhaps, though Qatari people drinks from their ancient traditions to create a new identity in a post Neo liberal era yet to be described worldwide. In the seek of a new promised land, what is now the promise?

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Danila Tkachenko

Oasis: 3

Archival Pigment Print
2018

Available in 2 sizes: Ed. 9: 130x100cm & Ed. 4:

200 x 150 cm

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(size plus photo frame) This project was commissioned by Qatar Museums as part of Qatar-Russia 2018 year of culture photographic exchange.

Por favor proporcione nombre y correo para información


5.00 m 3.00 m

Approximate view with unframed print. Ask for exact available dimensions

x

Danila Tkachenko

Oasis: 2

Oasis: 2

Archival Pigment Print
2018

130 x 100 cm

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(size plus photo frame) This project was commissioned by Qatar Museums as part of Qatar-Russia 2018 year of culture photographic exchange.

Por favor proporcione nombre y correo para información


5.00 m 3.00 m

Approximate view with unframed print. Ask for exact available dimensions

x

Danila Tkachenko

Oasis: 1

Archival Pigment Print
2018

Available in 2 sizes: Ed. 9: 130x100cm & Ed. 4:

200 x 150 cm

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(size plus photo frame) This project was commissioned by Qatar Museums as part of Qatar-Russia 2018 year of culture photographic exchange.

Por favor proporcione nombre y correo para información


5.00 m 3.00 m

Approximate view with unframed print. Ask for exact available dimensions

x

Danila Tkachenko

Motherland: 01

Archival Pigment Print
2017

Available in 2 sizes: Ed. 12: 62.5x50cm & Ed. 9:

120 x 96 cm

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(size plus photo frame) Since 1917 Russia’s rural population has contracted by more than 80%. The collectivisation of 1928-1937 was the first stage in the destruction of Russian villages. It was implemented to eradicate the historically established social order, and also to forcibly seize property and food from the peasant class for the state. Between 7 million and 8 million people died as a result of hunger and political repression, while over 2 million peasants were sent to the Gulag. By 1979 the number of villages had contracted by 60.2% (to 177,100). As a consequence of the centralisation and resettlement of the population, the logistics of harvests were disrupted, resulting in enormous losses in the agricultural sector, followed by rapid growth in food imports and an increase in social and political tension in the USSR. In modern Russia the trend of a contraction in the number of rural villages has continued. Over the past 20 years 23,000 villages have disappeared from the map of Russia, while small farmers are unable to compete with major corporations. According to the forecasts of some demographers, 96% of rural dwellers will live in cities by 2025. In other words, the rural population will disappear almost entirely. The project was filmed in territories located far from population centres and woodland. All manner of precautions were taken to prevent the spread of fire. The debris from constructed decorations were dismantled and taken away, while the used decrepit nonfunctional and destroyed structures were doomed to complete the process of physical disappearance within several years.

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5.00 m 3.00 m

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Danila Tkachenko

Motherland: 02. Cube

Archival Pigment Print
2017

Available in 2 sizes: Ed. 12: 62.5x50cm & Ed. 9:

120 x 96 cm

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(size plus photo frame) Since 1917 Russia’s rural population has contracted by more than 80%. The collectivisation of 1928-1937 was the first stage in the destruction of Russian villages. It was implemented to eradicate the historically established social order, and also to forcibly seize property and food from the peasant class for the state. Between 7 million and 8 million people died as a result of hunger and political repression, while over 2 million peasants were sent to the Gulag. By 1979 the number of villages had contracted by 60.2% (to 177,100). As a consequence of the centralisation and resettlement of the population, the logistics of harvests were disrupted, resulting in enormous losses in the agricultural sector, followed by rapid growth in food imports and an increase in social and political tension in the USSR. In modern Russia the trend of a contraction in the number of rural villages has continued. Over the past 20 years 23,000 villages have disappeared from the map of Russia, while small farmers are unable to compete with major corporations. According to the forecasts of some demographers, 96% of rural dwellers will live in cities by 2025. In other words, the rural population will disappear almost entirely. The project was filmed in territories located far from population centres and woodland. All manner of precautions were taken to prevent the spread of fire. The debris from constructed decorations were dismantled and taken away, while the used decrepit nonfunctional and destroyed structures were doomed to complete the process of physical disappearance within several years.

Por favor proporcione nombre y correo para información


5.00 m 3.00 m

Approximate view with unframed print. Ask for exact available dimensions

x

Danila Tkachenko

Motherland: 04

Archival Pigment Print
2017

Available in 2 sizes: Ed. 12: 62.5x50cm & Ed. 9:

120 x 96 cm

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(size plus photo frame) Since 1917 Russia’s rural population has contracted by more than 80%. The collectivisation of 1928-1937 was the first stage in the destruction of Russian villages. It was implemented to eradicate the historically established social order, and also to forcibly seize property and food from the peasant class for the state. Between 7 million and 8 million people died as a result of hunger and political repression, while over 2 million peasants were sent to the Gulag. By 1979 the number of villages had contracted by 60.2% (to 177,100). As a consequence of the centralisation and resettlement of the population, the logistics of harvests were disrupted, resulting in enormous losses in the agricultural sector, followed by rapid growth in food imports and an increase in social and political tension in the USSR. In modern Russia the trend of a contraction in the number of rural villages has continued. Over the past 20 years 23,000 villages have disappeared from the map of Russia, while small farmers are unable to compete with major corporations. According to the forecasts of some demographers, 96% of rural dwellers will live in cities by 2025. In other words, the rural population will disappear almost entirely. The project was filmed in territories located far from population centres and woodland. All manner of precautions were taken to prevent the spread of fire. The debris from constructed decorations were dismantled and taken away, while the used decrepit nonfunctional and destroyed structures were doomed to complete the process of physical disappearance within several years.

Por favor proporcione nombre y correo para información


5.00 m 3.00 m

Approximate view with unframed print. Ask for exact available dimensions

x

Danila Tkachenko

Motherland: 05

Archival Pigment Print
2017

Available in 2 sizes: Ed. 12: 62.5x50cm & Ed. 9:

120 x 96 cm

More
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(size plus photo frame) Since 1917 Russia’s rural population has contracted by more than 80%. The collectivisation of 1928-1937 was the first stage in the destruction of Russian villages. It was implemented to eradicate the historically established social order, and also to forcibly seize property and food from the peasant class for the state. Between 7 million and 8 million people died as a result of hunger and political repression, while over 2 million peasants were sent to the Gulag. By 1979 the number of villages had contracted by 60.2% (to 177,100). As a consequence of the centralisation and resettlement of the population, the logistics of harvests were disrupted, resulting in enormous losses in the agricultural sector, followed by rapid growth in food imports and an increase in social and political tension in the USSR. In modern Russia the trend of a contraction in the number of rural villages has continued. Over the past 20 years 23,000 villages have disappeared from the map of Russia, while small farmers are unable to compete with major corporations. According to the forecasts of some demographers, 96% of rural dwellers will live in cities by 2025. In other words, the rural population will disappear almost entirely. The project was filmed in territories located far from population centres and woodland. All manner of precautions were taken to prevent the spread of fire. The debris from constructed decorations were dismantled and taken away, while the used decrepit nonfunctional and destroyed structures were doomed to complete the process of physical disappearance within several years.

Por favor proporcione nombre y correo para información


5.00 m 3.00 m

Approximate view with unframed print. Ask for exact available dimensions

x

Danila Tkachenko

Motherland: 06

Archival Pigment Print
2017

Available in 2 sizes: Ed. 12: 62.5x50cm & Ed. 9:

120 x 96 cm

More
View in Room
inquire

(size plus photo frame) Since 1917 Russia’s rural population has contracted by more than 80%. The collectivisation of 1928-1937 was the first stage in the destruction of Russian villages. It was implemented to eradicate the historically established social order, and also to forcibly seize property and food from the peasant class for the state. Between 7 million and 8 million people died as a result of hunger and political repression, while over 2 million peasants were sent to the Gulag. By 1979 the number of villages had contracted by 60.2% (to 177,100). As a consequence of the centralisation and resettlement of the population, the logistics of harvests were disrupted, resulting in enormous losses in the agricultural sector, followed by rapid growth in food imports and an increase in social and political tension in the USSR. In modern Russia the trend of a contraction in the number of rural villages has continued. Over the past 20 years 23,000 villages have disappeared from the map of Russia, while small farmers are unable to compete with major corporations. According to the forecasts of some demographers, 96% of rural dwellers will live in cities by 2025. In other words, the rural population will disappear almost entirely. The project was filmed in territories located far from population centres and woodland. All manner of precautions were taken to prevent the spread of fire. The debris from constructed decorations were dismantled and taken away, while the used decrepit nonfunctional and destroyed structures were doomed to complete the process of physical disappearance within several years.

Por favor proporcione nombre y correo para información


5.00 m 3.00 m

Approximate view with unframed print. Ask for exact available dimensions

x

Danila Tkachenko

Motherland: 10

Archival Pigment Print
2017

Available in 2 sizes: Ed. 12: 62.5x50cm & Ed. 9:

120 x 96 cm

More
View in Room
inquire

(size plus photo frame) Since 1917 Russia’s rural population has contracted by more than 80%. The collectivisation of 1928-1937 was the first stage in the destruction of Russian villages. It was implemented to eradicate the historically established social order, and also to forcibly seize property and food from the peasant class for the state. Between 7 million and 8 million people died as a result of hunger and political repression, while over 2 million peasants were sent to the Gulag. By 1979 the number of villages had contracted by 60.2% (to 177,100). As a consequence of the centralisation and resettlement of the population, the logistics of harvests were disrupted, resulting in enormous losses in the agricultural sector, followed by rapid growth in food imports and an increase in social and political tension in the USSR. In modern Russia the trend of a contraction in the number of rural villages has continued. Over the past 20 years 23,000 villages have disappeared from the map of Russia, while small farmers are unable to compete with major corporations. According to the forecasts of some demographers, 96% of rural dwellers will live in cities by 2025. In other words, the rural population will disappear almost entirely. The project was filmed in territories located far from population centres and woodland. All manner of precautions were taken to prevent the spread of fire. The debris from constructed decorations were dismantled and taken away, while the used decrepit nonfunctional and destroyed structures were doomed to complete the process of physical disappearance within several years.

Por favor proporcione nombre y correo para información


5.00 m 3.00 m

Approximate view with unframed print. Ask for exact available dimensions

x

Danila Tkachenko

Motherland: 11

Archival Pigment Print
2017

Available in 2 sizes: Ed. 12: 62.5x50cm & Ed. 9:

120 x 96 cm

More
View in Room
inquire

(size plus photo frame) Since 1917 Russia’s rural population has contracted by more than 80%. The collectivisation of 1928-1937 was the first stage in the destruction of Russian villages. It was implemented to eradicate the historically established social order, and also to forcibly seize property and food from the peasant class for the state. Between 7 million and 8 million people died as a result of hunger and political repression, while over 2 million peasants were sent to the Gulag. By 1979 the number of villages had contracted by 60.2% (to 177,100). As a consequence of the centralisation and resettlement of the population, the logistics of harvests were disrupted, resulting in enormous losses in the agricultural sector, followed by rapid growth in food imports and an increase in social and political tension in the USSR. In modern Russia the trend of a contraction in the number of rural villages has continued. Over the past 20 years 23,000 villages have disappeared from the map of Russia, while small farmers are unable to compete with major corporations. According to the forecasts of some demographers, 96% of rural dwellers will live in cities by 2025. In other words, the rural population will disappear almost entirely. The project was filmed in territories located far from population centres and woodland. All manner of precautions were taken to prevent the spread of fire. The debris from constructed decorations were dismantled and taken away, while the used decrepit nonfunctional and destroyed structures were doomed to complete the process of physical disappearance within several years.

Por favor proporcione nombre y correo para información


5.00 m 3.00 m

Approximate view with unframed print. Ask for exact available dimensions

x

Danila Tkachenko

Motherland: 12

Archival Pigment Print
2017

Available in 2 sizes: Ed. 12: 62.5x50cm & Ed. 9:

120 x 96 cm

More
View in Room
inquire

(size plus photo frame) Since 1917 Russia’s rural population has contracted by more than 80%. The collectivisation of 1928-1937 was the first stage in the destruction of Russian villages. It was implemented to eradicate the historically established social order, and also to forcibly seize property and food from the peasant class for the state. Between 7 million and 8 million people died as a result of hunger and political repression, while over 2 million peasants were sent to the Gulag. By 1979 the number of villages had contracted by 60.2% (to 177,100). As a consequence of the centralisation and resettlement of the population, the logistics of harvests were disrupted, resulting in enormous losses in the agricultural sector, followed by rapid growth in food imports and an increase in social and political tension in the USSR. In modern Russia the trend of a contraction in the number of rural villages has continued. Over the past 20 years 23,000 villages have disappeared from the map of Russia, while small farmers are unable to compete with major corporations. According to the forecasts of some demographers, 96% of rural dwellers will live in cities by 2025. In other words, the rural population will disappear almost entirely. The project was filmed in territories located far from population centres and woodland. All manner of precautions were taken to prevent the spread of fire. The debris from constructed decorations were dismantled and taken away, while the used decrepit nonfunctional and destroyed structures were doomed to complete the process of physical disappearance within several years.

Por favor proporcione nombre y correo para información


5.00 m 3.00 m

Approximate view with unframed print. Ask for exact available dimensions

x

Danila Tkachenko

Motherland: 13

Archival Pigment Print
2017

Available in 2 sizes: Ed. 12: 62.5x50cm & Ed. 9:

120 x 96 cm

More
View in Room
inquire

(size plus photo frame) Since 1917 Russia’s rural population has contracted by more than 80%. The collectivisation of 1928-1937 was the first stage in the destruction of Russian villages. It was implemented to eradicate the historically established social order, and also to forcibly seize property and food from the peasant class for the state. Between 7 million and 8 million people died as a result of hunger and political repression, while over 2 million peasants were sent to the Gulag. By 1979 the number of villages had contracted by 60.2% (to 177,100). As a consequence of the centralisation and resettlement of the population, the logistics of harvests were disrupted, resulting in enormous losses in the agricultural sector, followed by rapid growth in food imports and an increase in social and political tension in the USSR. In modern Russia the trend of a contraction in the number of rural villages has continued. Over the past 20 years 23,000 villages have disappeared from the map of Russia, while small farmers are unable to compete with major corporations. According to the forecasts of some demographers, 96% of rural dwellers will live in cities by 2025. In other words, the rural population will disappear almost entirely. The project was filmed in territories located far from population centres and woodland. All manner of precautions were taken to prevent the spread of fire. The debris from constructed decorations were dismantled and taken away, while the used decrepit nonfunctional and destroyed structures were doomed to complete the process of physical disappearance within several years.

Por favor proporcione nombre y correo para información


5.00 m 3.00 m

Approximate view with unframed print. Ask for exact available dimensions

x

Danila Tkachenko

Monuments 05

Archival Pigment Print
2017

Available in 2 sizes: Ed.5: 120x100cm & Ed. 7:

90 x 70 cm

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(size plus photo frame) The project Monuments (2017) researches the boundaries of historical memory, the area between fact and fiction. As in the case of political regimes in general, every single one of us is individually inclined to exploit images of the past to meet our current needs or future goals. We come up with new interpretations and build additional structures to manipulate images of past history. I erect on abandoned historical sites lightweight structures in abstract modernist shapes, transforming a historical ruin into a contemporary site and thereby imitating the position on history assumed by the powers that be. During the filming not a single site suffered. At the end of the work, all the decorations were dismantled.

Por favor proporcione nombre y correo para información


5.00 m 3.00 m

Approximate view with unframed print. Ask for exact available dimensions

x

Danila Tkachenko

Monuments 06

Archival Pigment Print
2017

Available in 2 sizes: Ed.5: 120x100cm & Ed. 7:

90 x 70 cm

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(size plus photo frame) The project Monuments (2017) researches the boundaries of historical memory, the area between fact and fiction. As in the case of political regimes in general, every single one of us is individually inclined to exploit images of the past to meet our current needs or future goals. We come up with new interpretations and build additional structures to manipulate images of past history. I erect on abandoned historical sites lightweight structures in abstract modernist shapes, transforming a historical ruin into a contemporary site and thereby imitating the position on history assumed by the powers that be. During the filming not a single site suffered. At the end of the work, all the decorations were dismantled.

Por favor proporcione nombre y correo para información


5.00 m 3.00 m

Approximate view with unframed print. Ask for exact available dimensions

x

Danila Tkachenko

Lost Horizon: Central Computing Center

Archival pigment print
2016

Ed. 7:

122 x 122 cm

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Lost Horizon (Horizonte perdido), 2016. El mundo prometido por la Revolución de octubre tendría que haber sido no solo justo y próspero, sino que debía haber trascendido el planeta para colonizar el espacio exterior. El régimen socialista debía haber sido establecido no solo en el espacio, sino en el tiempo, ayudado por la tecnología que habría permitido convertir un instante en eternidad. Sin embargo, precisamente con el paso del tiempo, las fallas económicas han traído toda suerte de desilusión sobre las utopías políticas y sobre la promesa de un futuro brillante. En Lost Horizon, Tkachenko captura objetos que representan la imagen de un futuro cósmico ideal perdido. Tkachenko eligió el formato 6x6, para encapsular el estado utópico de los proyectos futuristas en la forma suprematista propuesta por su connacional Kasimir Malevich’s, fundador de las Vanguardias rusas en su célebre ‘Cuadrado negro’ de 1917, que constituyendo una pieza revolucionaria del arte, refleja la época histórica en que fue concebido.

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5.00 m 3.00 m

Approximate view with unframed print. Ask for exact available dimensions

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Danila Tkachenko

Lost Horizon: “Friendship” Pension, Crimea

Archival pigment print
2016

Ed. 7:

122 x 122 cm

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Lost Horizon (Horizonte perdido), 2016. El mundo prometido por la Revolución de octubre tendría que haber sido no solo justo y próspero, sino que debía haber trascendido el planeta para colonizar el espacio exterior. El régimen socialista debía haber sido establecido no solo en el espacio, sino en el tiempo, ayudado por la tecnología que habría permitido convertir un instante en eternidad. Sin embargo, precisamente con el paso del tiempo, las fallas económicas han traído toda suerte de desilusión sobre las utopías políticas y sobre la promesa de un futuro brillante. En Lost Horizon, Tkachenko captura objetos que representan la imagen de un futuro cósmico ideal perdido. Tkachenko eligió el formato 6x6, para encapsular el estado utópico de los proyectos futuristas en la forma suprematista propuesta por su connacional Kasimir Malevich’s, fundador de las Vanguardias rusas en su célebre ‘Cuadrado negro’ de 1917, que constituyendo una pieza revolucionaria del arte, refleja la época histórica en que fue concebido.

Por favor proporcione nombre y correo para información


5.00 m 3.00 m

Approximate view with unframed print. Ask for exact available dimensions

x

Danila Tkachenko

Archival pigment print
2016

122 x 122 cm

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Por favor proporcione nombre y correo para información


5.00 m 3.00 m

Approximate view with unframed print. Ask for exact available dimensions

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Danila Tkachenko

Lost Horizon: Model of the Headquarters of the Third International

2016
Archival Pigment Print
Ed. of 7 + 2 A.P

80 x 80 cm

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Lost Horizon (Horizonte perdido), 2016. El mundo prometido por la Revolución de octubre tendría que haber sido no solo justo y próspero, sino que debía haber trascendido el planeta para colonizar el espacio exterior. El régimen socialista debía haber sido establecido no solo en el espacio, sino en el tiempo, ayudado por la tecnología que habría permitido convertir un instante en eternidad. Sin embargo, precisamente con el paso del tiempo, las fallas económicas han traído toda suerte de desilusión sobre las utopías políticas y sobre la promesa de un futuro brillante. En Lost Horizon, Tkachenko captura objetos que representan la imagen de un futuro cósmico ideal perdido. Tkachenko eligió el formato 6x6, para encapsular el estado utópico de los proyectos futuristas en la forma suprematista propuesta por su connacional Kasimir Malevich’s, fundador de las Vanguardias rusas en su célebre ‘Cuadrado negro’ de 1917, que constituyendo una pieza revolucionaria del arte, refleja la época histórica en que fue concebido.

Por favor proporcione nombre y correo para información


5.00 m 3.00 m

Approximate view with unframed print. Ask for exact available dimensions

x

Danila Tkachenko

Lost Horizon: Marx generator for high-energy physics experiments

Archival pigment print
2016

Ed. 7:

122 x 122 cm

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Lost Horizon (Horizonte perdido), 2016. El mundo prometido por la Revolución de octubre tendría que haber sido no solo justo y próspero, sino que debía haber trascendido el planeta para colonizar el espacio exterior. El régimen socialista debía haber sido establecido no solo en el espacio, sino en el tiempo, ayudado por la tecnología que habría permitido convertir un instante en eternidad. Sin embargo, precisamente con el paso del tiempo, las fallas económicas han traído toda suerte de desilusión sobre las utopías políticas y sobre la promesa de un futuro brillante. En Lost Horizon, Tkachenko captura objetos que representan la imagen de un futuro cósmico ideal perdido. Tkachenko eligió el formato 6x6, para encapsular el estado utópico de los proyectos futuristas en la forma suprematista propuesta por su connacional Kasimir Malevich’s, fundador de las Vanguardias rusas en su célebre ‘Cuadrado negro’ de 1917, que constituyendo una pieza revolucionaria del arte, refleja la época histórica en que fue concebido.

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5.00 m 3.00 m

Approximate view with unframed print. Ask for exact available dimensions

x

Danila Tkachenko

Lost Horizon: Monument to the atoms

Archival pigment print
2016

Ed. 7:

122 x 122 cm

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Lost Horizon (Horizonte perdido), 2016. El mundo prometido por la Revolución de octubre tendría que haber sido no solo justo y próspero, sino que debía haber trascendido el planeta para colonizar el espacio exterior. El régimen socialista debía haber sido establecido no solo en el espacio, sino en el tiempo, ayudado por la tecnología que habría permitido convertir un instante en eternidad. Sin embargo, precisamente con el paso del tiempo, las fallas económicas han traído toda suerte de desilusión sobre las utopías políticas y sobre la promesa de un futuro brillante. En Lost Horizon, Tkachenko captura objetos que representan la imagen de un futuro cósmico ideal perdido. Tkachenko eligió el formato 6x6, para encapsular el estado utópico de los proyectos futuristas en la forma suprematista propuesta por su connacional Kasimir Malevich’s, fundador de las Vanguardias rusas en su célebre ‘Cuadrado negro’ de 1917, que constituyendo una pieza revolucionaria del arte, refleja la época histórica en que fue concebido.

Por favor proporcione nombre y correo para información


5.00 m 3.00 m

Approximate view with unframed print. Ask for exact available dimensions

x

Danila Tkachenko

Restricted Areas: Desertive Observatory

Archival pigment print

2015
Ed. 6:

120 x 96 cm

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Restricted Areas (‘Zonas Restringidas’) ‘Áreas restringidas’ (2015), es una aproximación del impulso humano por la utopía y sobre nuestra búsqueda de la perfección a través del progreso tecnológico. Para realizar la serie, Tkachenko viajó a través de diversos países de la antigua URSS, en busca de lugares que utilizan para mantener una gran importancia a la idea de progreso tecnológico que ahora yacen desiertos. Han perdido su significado, junto con su ideología utópica, que hoy es obsoleta.

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5.00 m 3.00 m

Approximate view with unframed print. Ask for exact available dimensions

x

Danila Tkachenko

Restricted Areas: Monument to the Conquerors of the Space

Archival pigment print

2015
Ed. 6:

120 x 96 cm

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Restricted Areas (‘Zonas Restringidas’) ‘Áreas restringidas’ (2015), es una aproximación del impulso humano por la utopía y sobre nuestra búsqueda de la perfección a través del progreso tecnológico. Para realizar la serie, Tkachenko viajó a través de diversos países de la antigua URSS, en busca de lugares que utilizan para mantener una gran importancia a la idea de progreso tecnológico que ahora yacen desiertos. Han perdido su significado, junto con su ideología utópica, que hoy es obsoleta.

Por favor proporcione nombre y correo para información


5.00 m 3.00 m

Approximate view with unframed print. Ask for exact available dimensions

x

Danila Tkachenko

Restricted Areas: Desertive Observatory Kazakhstan

Archival pigment print

2015
Ed. 6:

120 x 96 cm

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Restricted Areas (‘Zonas Restringidas’) ‘Áreas restringidas’ (2015), es una aproximación del impulso humano por la utopía y sobre nuestra búsqueda de la perfección a través del progreso tecnológico. Para realizar la serie, Tkachenko viajó a través de diversos países de la antigua URSS, en busca de lugares que utilizan para mantener una gran importancia a la idea de progreso tecnológico que ahora yacen desiertos. Han perdido su significado, junto con su ideología utópica, que hoy es obsoleta.

Por favor proporcione nombre y correo para información


5.00 m 3.00 m

Approximate view with unframed print. Ask for exact available dimensions

x

Danila Tkachenko

The Last Resident: 01

Archival pigment print

2014
Ed. 24:

50 x 40 cm

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The Last Resident (‘El último residente’) (2014) es un estudio que hace referencia a las utopías de la exploración del espacio y su entorno social que narra la desaparición de las aldeas. En Rusia, como en otras partes del mundo, cada año perecen cientos, incluso miles de poblados cuyos habitantes emigran a otros lugares. De 1993 a 2004, en el vasto territorio ruso 23000 pueblos fueron oficialmente cerrados, mientras que la población de las ciudades está en constante crecimiento. La estética del proyecto se inspira en la pintura, donde se utiliza la luz para iluminar el paisaje nocturno, como lo hacía el pintor ruso de ascendencia griega, Arkhip Kuindzhi.

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5.00 m 3.00 m

Approximate view with unframed print. Ask for exact available dimensions

x

Danila Tkachenko

The Last Resident: 02

Archival pigment print

2014
Ed. 24:

50 x 40 cm

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The Last Resident (‘El último residente’) (2014) es un estudio que hace referencia a las utopías de la exploración del espacio y su entorno social que narra la desaparición de las aldeas. En Rusia, como en otras partes del mundo, cada año perecen cientos, incluso miles de poblados cuyos habitantes emigran a otros lugares. De 1993 a 2004, en el vasto territorio ruso 23000 pueblos fueron oficialmente cerrados, mientras que la población de las ciudades está en constante crecimiento. La estética del proyecto se inspira en la pintura, donde se utiliza la luz para iluminar el paisaje nocturno, como lo hacía el pintor ruso de ascendencia griega, Arkhip Kuindzhi.

Por favor proporcione nombre y correo para información


5.00 m 3.00 m

Approximate view with unframed print. Ask for exact available dimensions

x

Danila Tkachenko

The Last Resident: 03

Archival pigment print

2014
Ed. 24:

50 x 40 cm

More
View in Room
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The Last Resident (‘El último residente’) (2014) es un estudio que hace referencia a las utopías de la exploración del espacio y su entorno social que narra la desaparición de las aldeas. En Rusia, como en otras partes del mundo, cada año perecen cientos, incluso miles de poblados cuyos habitantes emigran a otros lugares. De 1993 a 2004, en el vasto territorio ruso 23000 pueblos fueron oficialmente cerrados, mientras que la población de las ciudades está en constante crecimiento. La estética del proyecto se inspira en la pintura, donde se utiliza la luz para iluminar el paisaje nocturno, como lo hacía el pintor ruso de ascendencia griega, Arkhip Kuindzhi.

Por favor proporcione nombre y correo para información


5.00 m 3.00 m

Approximate view with unframed print. Ask for exact available dimensions

x

Danila Tkachenko

Exhibition view

Duo show with Mara Sánchez-Renero "The Big Unknown"
2017

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5.00 m 3.00 m

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Danila Tkachenko

Exhibition view

Duo show with Mara Sánchez-Renero "The Big Unknown"
2017

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5.00 m 3.00 m

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Danila Tkachenko

Exhibition view

Zona Maco Foto
2016

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