Motherland: 02. Cube

2017
Ed. 9 + 1 A.P.
Archival pigment print

120 x 96 cm

62,5 x 50 cm
Ed. 12 + 1 A.P.
Archival pigment print

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Monuments 05

2018
Ed. 1/5 + 1 A.P.
Archival pigment print

90 x 72 cm

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Monuments 06

2018
Ed. 1/5 + 1 A.P.
Archival pigment print

90 x 72 cm

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Danila Tkachenko

Lost Horizon: “Friendship” Pension, Crimea

2016
Ed. 6 + 2 A.P.
Archival pigment print

120 x 120 cm

80 x 80 cm
Ed. 7 + 2 A.P.
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Lost Horizon (2016). The world promised by the October Revolution had to be not only fair and prosperous, but to also colonise the outer space. Socialism should have been established not only in space, but also in time, aided by technology which would allow to turn time into eternity. But over time, the economical failures had also brought disillusionment about the political utopia and about the promised bright future. In Lost Horizon, Tkachenko shot objects, which represent the image of the ideal cosmic future. He chose the format 6×6, encapsulating the utopian state projects into the Suprematist form of his fellow compatriot artist founder of the Russian Avant-Gard Kasimir Malevich’s ‘The Black Square’ from 1917, which being a revolutionary art piece, reflects the historical epoch it was conceived in.

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Lost Horizon: Model of the Headquarters of the Third International. Moscow

2016
Ed. 7 + 2 A.P.
Archival pigment print

80 x 80 cm

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Lost Horizon (2016). The world promised by the October Revolution had to be not only fair and prosperous, but to also colonise the outer space. Socialism should have been established not only in space, but also in time, aided by technology which would allow to turn time into eternity. But over time, the economical failures had also brought disillusionment about the political utopia and about the promised bright future. In Lost Horizon, Tkachenko shot objects, which represent the image of the ideal cosmic future. He chose the format 6×6, encapsulating the utopian state projects into the Suprematist form of his fellow compatriot artist founder of the Russian Avant-Gard Kasimir Malevich’s ‘The Black Square’ from 1917, which being a revolutionary art piece, reflects the historical epoch it was conceived in.

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Restricted Area: Monument of the Conquerors of the Space

2015
Ed. 6 + 1 A.P.
Archival pigment print

120 x 96 cm

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Restricted Areas (2015) is a series about the utopian strive of humans for technological progress. Better, higher, stronger… Always trying to own ever more this human desire is the source of technical progress including commodities and grandeur as well as the tools of violence that keep power over the other. “I travel in search of places which used to have great importance for the technical progress and are now deserted. Those places lost their significance together with its utopian ideology which is now obsolete. Secret cities that could not be found on maps, forgotten scientific triumphs and abandoned buildings of almost inhuman complexity. The perfect technocratic imagery of a future that never came.” For Restricted Areas, Tkachenko traveled the former countries part of the former USSR, in search of places that used to hold great importance for the idea of technological progress. These places are now deserted. They have lost their significance, along with their utopian ideology, which is now obsolete. “Any progress comes to an end sooner or later. It can happen due to different reasons: nuclear war, economic crisis or natural disasters. For me it is interesting to witness what is left after.”

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Danila Tkachenko

The Last Resident: 01

2014
Ed. 24 + 2 A.P.
Archival pigment print

49 x 39 cm

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The Last Resident (2014) is a study, referring to space exploration utopias and its social background narrating the phenomena of disappearing villages. In Russia, like in other countries, there are hundreds, even thousands of villages and small towns dying off. From 1993 to 2004, 23000 villages and towns were officially closed, while the population of cities is constantly growing. The project’s aesthetics was inspired by painting where light is used to illuminate the nocturnal scenery, such as by Russian landscape painter of Greek descent, Arkhip Kuindzhi.

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Danila Tkachenko

The Last Resident: 02

2014
Ed. 24 + 2 A.P.
Archival pigment print

49 x 39 cm

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The Last Resident (2014) is a study, referring to space exploration utopias and its social background narrating the phenomena of disappearing villages. In Russia, like in other countries, there are hundreds, even thousands of villages and small towns dying off. From 1993 to 2004, 23000 villages and towns were officially closed, while the population of cities is constantly growing. The project’s aesthetics was inspired by painting where light is used to illuminate the nocturnal scenery, such as by Russian landscape painter of Greek descent, Arkhip Kuindzhi.

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Danila Tkachenko

The Last Resident: 03

2014
Ed. 24 + 2 A.P.
Archival pigment print

49 x 39 cm

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The Last Resident (2014) is a study, referring to space exploration utopias and its social background narrating the phenomena of disappearing villages. In Russia, like in other countries, there are hundreds, even thousands of villages and small towns dying off. From 1993 to 2004, 23000 villages and towns were officially closed, while the population of cities is constantly growing. The project’s aesthetics was inspired by painting where light is used to illuminate the nocturnal scenery, such as by Russian landscape painter of Greek descent, Arkhip Kuindzhi.

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“They say the next big thing is here, That the revolution's near,

But to me it seems quite clear that it's all just a little bit of history repeating”

The Propellerheads

 

DANILA TKACHENKO, RUSIA, 1989 shows a group of images taken in an instant made as time slowly goes by though History. Regarding the impossible task to explain it, Leon Tolstoy said in his 2nd Epilogue for his book War and Peace :

“The goal toward which humanity is being led seems to be known for the historians: to one of them is the greatness of the States... to another it is liberty, equality, and a certain kind of civilization.”

About an episode that seems to describe every regime change he said:

“In 1812 the ferment [araised in Paris] reached its extreme limit: Moscow… During that twenty-year period an immense number of fields were left untilled, houses were burned, trade changed its direction, millions of men migrated, were impoverished, or were enriched, and millions… slew one another.”

“What does all this mean?” asked Tolstoy in 1867, answering: “If history had retained the conception of the ancients it would have said that God, to reward or punish his people, gave Napoleon power and directed his will to the fulfillment of the divine ends… But modern history cannot give that reply”.

In the XXI century, contemporary historians still do not find convincing explanations neither about past nor about present.  

Danila Tkachenko, has been capturing the remains of recent regimes at the dawn of a world’s new order. About his Lost Horizon series, he says: “Socialism should have been established not only in space but in time... But over time, the economical failures had also brought disillusionment about the political utopia and about the promised bright future.”

Regarding his Restricted Areas series he adds: “I travel in search of places which used to have great importance for the technical progress and are now deserted. They lost their significance. Any progress comes to an end… for me, it is interesting to witness what is left afterwards.”

The production of the Russian artist holds an aesthetic traversed by time and makes reference to yesterday artistic movements. His deserted observatories recall the Düsseldorf School, while his buildings emerging from black squares evoques the Suprematism and Land-art seems to prowl his Monuments.

His images place us in front of the History that, resisting interpretation, is ready to be contemplated.